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海波

About 海波

海波1962年出生於吉林長春。他的藝術理想是用照片來複製已經消逝的時光。在他充滿溫情又具鄉土氣息的照片里,熟悉的人和景物在柔和的光線中成為永恆。1982年,當海波在大學攝影課上第一次接觸照相機時,他就對快門凝固下的永恆瞬間充滿了驚異。相比較強調主觀性的油畫創作,海波發現反映真實和自然的攝影更能表達自己的感受。二十多年來,他的照片從未遠離過熟悉的鄉村生活,攝影手法也大多簡單樸素,但卻由於其真誠表現生活而被賦予了感人至深的力量。他的作品被蓋蒂美術館、紐約大都會博物館、華盛頓史密斯索尼亞賽克勒畫廊、昆士蘭美術館、中國美術館、廣東美術館等知名機構收藏。

Press Release

  • Hai Bo

    Pace Beijing is pleased to present the solo exhibition of Hai Bo, one of China’s most important conceptual photographers. This will be the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. Hai Bo expresses his understanding of art and creativity through his photographic practice. Since 1987, Hai Bo has worked continuously in the rural areas of Northeast China, leading to the completion of numerous series of work. In his photographs, Hai Bo tends to choose a specific location as a starting point. By introducing the effects of time and narrative into his photographs, he explores the unavoidable changes that occur throughout history, both external and internal. These poetic images stand as a lyrical memorial to the endurance of time and nature.

    This exhibition will feature both Hai Bo’s iconic and most recent works. Untitled No. 8, completed in 2009, portrays an old man in the dusk, flanked by significant still-life objects from his life. By flanking the image of an elderly man with a pile of potatoes and a clock, Hai Bo visualizes the traditional metaphor of life and time in a delicate and subtle manner, and manages to convey a sense of permanence and immutability under the ever-changing surface of reality. Hai Bo demonstrates his ability to excel at recording constant change through photography.

    One of Hai Bo’s iconic series, The Photographic Diary, uses seemingly scattered visual fragments of everyday life to record people’s habitual memories that have the tendency to erode and disappear gradually over time. These fractured mental images often flash back through the subconscious like a rebus, encouraging people to reexamine themselves in a way that is separate from narration, and to regain lost memories through a stream of consciousness approach.

    This exhibition will also display Hai Bo’s latest series, The Blind. The artist chose a blind fortune-teller as the subject in order to explore both the human desire to control fate as well as, realistically, our helplessness. Hai Bo reflects on the fear of the unknown, pursuit of lost memories and the consequential, inevitable sadness that comes with the longing for something that will last forever. Hai Bo, who is now in his fifties, has chosen to express his ideas on the ever-changing nature of life as well as the unpredictability of fate through his new photographic works. They seem to suggest that even in these uncertain times, some things remain constant.

    Hai Bo was born in 1962 in Changchun, China. He currently lives and works in Beijing. Hai Bo has shown and gained popularity both locally and internationally, including exhibitions such as Hai Bo at Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York, U.S.A (2011) and Perspectives: Hai Bo at Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Washington DC, U.S.A (2010). He was also included in international group exhibitions such as The China Project at Gallery of Modern Art and Queensland Art Gallery, Queensland, Australia (2009) and Journeys: Mapping the Earth and Mind in Chinese Art at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, U.S.A (2007). Hai Bo was awarded The Martell Artist of the Year prize in 2011 and Chinese Contemporary Art Award in 2000. His works are in numerous public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery ,Queensland Art Gallery, National Art Museum of China, Guangdong Museum of Art.