Alicja Kwade

Zona Maco

Past
Feb 7 – Feb 11, 2024
Mexico City
 
Art Fair Details

Zona Maco
Centro Citibanamex
Booth B117
February 7 – 11, 2024

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Above: Alicja Kwade, Trans-for-Men 7, 2023 © Alicja Kwade
Pace Gallery is pleased to announce details of its presentation at Zona Maco in Mexico City from February 7–11, 2024.

Returning to the fair for the first time since 2020, the gallery will present vibrant modern and contemporary works on its booth (#B117)—including paintings, sculptures, and works on paper—by Alexander Calder, Mary Corse, Tara Donovan, Alicja Kwade, Kylie Manning, Roberto Matta, Yoshitomo Nara, Marina Perez Simão, Alejandro Piñeiro Bello, Joel Shapiro, Arlene Shechet, and Mika Tajima.

A large-scale painted bronze sculpture by Joel Shapiro, whose exhibition at Meridiano in Puerto Escondido coincides with Zona Maco, will figure prominently on Pace’s booth. This untitled sculpture from 2022 reflects Shapiro's interest in exploring—and occasionally erasing—the line between abstraction and figuration through explorations of color, form, and movement. The gallery’s presentation will also feature Trans-for-Men 7 (2023), a mixed media sculpture by Alicja Kwade, who engages with scientific and philosophical subjects in her practice. During the run of Zona Maco, Kwade’s work is on view as part of Beyond Behind | Alicja Kwade y Gregor Hildebrandt, a two-artist exhibition at the Museo de Arte de Zapopan in Guadalajara.

The booth will spotlight two recent paintings by Alejandro Piñeiro Bello, who often examines the sociocultural dimensions of the Caribbean and its diaspora. Using traditional materials such as oil on raw linen or burlap, he creates striking layers of color in his paintings, evoking the natural landscapes and folkloric traditions of the Caribbean. His abstract and semi-abstract compositions take on fantastical qualities, revealing unexplored places in the artist’s own subconscious. Originario (2023), on view as part of Pace’s presentation at Zona Maco, features explosions of color, light, and baroque forms that reflect the artist's deep interest in the beauty and chaos of the natural world.

The gallery will also bring together paintings by Mary Corse, Kylie Manning, Roberto Matta, Marina Perez Simão, and Mika Tajima, along with three lively works on paper by Alexander Calder. Contemporary abstractions by Tajima, whose solo exhibition at Pace’s New York gallery continues through the fair’s run; Simão, who is presenting a solo show with Pace in Los Angeles through March 2; and Corse will be situated in conversation with a large-scale, otherworldly canvas by Matta, a key figure in Surrealism. Meanwhile, Manning’s lyrical painting Pyrexia (2023) will lend a figurative dimension to the booth. Highlights also include a selection of gouache and ink works created by Calder in 1971—the mesmeric spirals in these two-dimensional compositions can be understood in visual dialogue with the forms from his iconic sculptures.

A specially designed backroom attached to the booth will showcase a focused selection of ceramics by Yoshitomo Nara, who first began experimenting with clay in 2007 during a residency in Shigaraki, Japan. His ceramic works, which were recently the subject of a solo exhibition at Pace’s Seoul gallery, are deeply expressionistic, featuring idiosyncratic plays of shape and texture. Also in the way of sculpture, Pace’s Zona Maco booth will include Grow and Glow (2023), a polished cast bronze, steel, and hardwood work by Arlene Shechet, and Tara Donovan’s untitled 2021 wall-mounted installation composed entirely of Slinkys®.

 

Featured Works

Alicja Kwade, Trans-for-Men 7, 2023, stone, bronze, bronze patinated, petrified wood, corten steel, glass, mirror, 107 cm × 426 cm × 76 cm (42-1/8" × 13' 11-11/16" × 29-15/16")

Alicja Kwade

b. 1979, Katowice, Poland
Lives and works in Berlin, Germany

Alicja Kwade’s Trans-for-Men 7 (2023) is a study in material transformation. Seven distinct objects are divided by double-sided mirrors that both conceal and expose portions of each object as the viewer moves around the sculpture, revealing new structures. The transformation from one object to another—from bronze patinated polyhedron to opaque glass bowl—occurs gradually and through distinct material and structural metamorphoses. The conceptual schema of Trans-for-Men 7 derives from the philosophical concept of emergence, which dates from at least the time of Aristotle, and was later coined by English philosopher G. H. Lewes in 1875, positing that novel and complex properties, patterns, or phenomena can arise at a higher level of organization, not predictable from or reducible to the properties of its simpler constituents. In short, emergence explains that the whole of a body or system may be greater than the sum of its parts. In Trans-for-Men 7, the visual metaphor afforded by the double-sided mirrors suggests that the collective impact of these distinct elements, when observed from different perspectives, yields an outcome that surpasses the aggregate of its individual components. The present work belongs to Kwade’s body of Trans-for-Men sculptures, each of which draws from the same conceptual framework, but contains a different quantity and combination of objects. Trans-for-Men 7 advances Kwade’s engagement with emergence and furthers her career-spanning experimentation with material illusions and transformations.

Brent Wadden, Untitled, 2022, Hand-woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas, image, 185 cm × 119 cm (72-13/16" × 46-7/8")

Brent Wadden

b. 1979, Nova Scotia, Canada

Mary Corse, Untitled (White, White, Blue, Beveled), 2023, glass microspheres in acrylic on canvas, 50" × 50" × 4-1/2" (127 cm × 127 cm × 11.4 cm)

Mary Corse

b. 1945, Berkeley, California

Trevor Paglen, CLOUD #489 Progressive Probabilistic Hough Transform, 2022, Dye sublimation print, 48" × 60" (121.9 cm × 152.4 cm) work 49-1/8" × 61-1/8" × 2" (124.8 cm × 155.3 cm × 5.1 cm) frame (white)

Trevor Paglen

b. 1974, Camp Springs, Maryland

Elmgreen & Dragset, Cielo sobre Acapulco, 2024, stainless steel, oil paint, 51-3/16" × 51-3/16" × 1" (130 cm × 130 cm × 2.5 cm)

Elmgreen & Dragset

Michael Elmgreen | b. 1961, Copenhagen, Denmark
Ingar Dragset | b. 1969, Trondheim, Norway

Mika Tajima, Art d'Ameublement (Pointe Max Douguet), 2023, Spray acrylic, thermoformed PETG, 90" × 67" (228.6 cm × 170.2 cm)

Mika Tajima

b. 1975, Los Angeles

Roberto Matta, Beau bleu fou, 1976, oil on canvas, 78-1/2" × 9' 6-1/2" (199.4 cm × 290.8 cm)

Roberto Matta

b. 1911, Santiago, Chile
d. 2002, Civitavecchia, Italy

The hazy techno-celestial forms that comprise Matta’s Untitled (1976) are emblematic of his paintings from the late 1970s, a period of work characterized by idiosyncratic mechanical and bodily forms that exemplify the grotesque and miraculous consequences of technological innovation. Beginning in the 40s, Matta produced works he called “inscapes:” imaginary landscapes constructed from the artist’s psyche. This interiority was upended by geopolitical events of the mid-20th century, which transformed his mode of thinking regarding the purpose of his work, catalyzing the artist to take a more politically minded approach to painting in the aftermath of the Second World War and the Cold War. In the 60s, he became an outspoken supporter of Chile’s Socialist president Salvador Allende Gossens. When the dictator Augusto Pinochet took control of Chile in 1973, stripping Matta of his Chilean citizenship for his opposition to the regime, and after he had been blacklisted from the United States in the 50s for being a Communist, he sought French citizenship. This political upheaval brought a new dimension to Matta’s work while, in another sense, destroying what had existed before; his mural The First Goal of the Chilean People (1971), installed under the Allende government, was desecrated by the Pinochet regime. [1] Matta’s politically charged works took on themes of capitalism and machinery, often showcasing the violence and malicious tediousness of industry and the oppression of the laborer. Untitled, painted at monumental scale, is a cosmos of biomorphic, dreamlike forms emerging from a ruptured machine. Small oyster- like figures reveal bursts of bright color, symbolizing the potential energy of human creativity stifled by capitalist machinery. The otherworldly scene in Untitled meditates on the arc of industrial change and the effects of capitalism seen through the lens of a painter in dialogue with his own consciousness.

  1. Justin Spring, “Rediscovering Matta at 100,” in Matta: A Centennial Celebration (New York: Pace Gallery, 2011), 5.
 

All Works

Peter Alexander,
6/20/14 (Turquoise Bar)
2014, urethane, 77-1/2" × 6-1/2" × 1-3/4" (196.9 cm × 16.5 cm × 4.4 cm)
Sold
Mary Corse,
Untitled (White, White, Blue, Beveled),
2023
2023, glass microspheres in acrylic on canvas, 50" × 50" × 4-1/2" (127 cm × 127 cm × 11.4 cm)
Sold
Tara Donovan,
Untitled
2021, Slinkys®, 57-1/2" × 56-1/2" (146.1 cm × 143.5 cm)
Available
Elmgreen & Dragset,
Cielo sobre Acapulco,
2024
2024, stainless steel, oil paint, 51-3/16" × 51-3/16" × 1" (130 cm × 130 cm × 2.5 cm)
Reserved
Adrian Ghenie,
The Reader 2
2023, oil on canvas, 100 cm × 70 cm (39-3/8" × 27-9/16") 103.4 cm × 73.4 cm × 7 cm (40-11/16" × 28-7/8" × 2-3/4"), framed
Sold
Alfred Jensen,
Revolving Spheres,
1959
1959, oil on canvas, 6' 3" x 8' 4" (190.5 x 254 cm) two panels, each: 6' 3" x 4' 2" (190.5 x 127 cm)
Sold
Acaye Kerunen,
Ebiinu (she has come, has she come? is she coming?),
2023
2023, Raffia, stripped and hand-dyed palm leaves, stripped and dyed sorghum stems, twined sisal, 281 cm × 70 cm × 50 cm (9' 2-5/8" × 27-9/16" × 19-11/16")
Available
Alicja Kwade,
Trans-for-Men 7
2023, stone, bronze, bronze patinated, petrified wood, corten steel, glass, mirror, 107 cm × 426 cm × 76 cm (42-1/8" × 13' 11-11/16" × 29-15/16")
Sold
Maya Lin,
the origin of wilderness - Pin River Gila,
2024
2024, stainless steel pins, 39" × 48" × 1-1/2" (99.1 cm × 121.9 cm × 3.8 cm)
Sold
Robert Longo,
Untitled (Black Panther),
2022
2022, Charcoal on mounted paper, 65" x 40" (165.1 cm x 101.6 cm), image 70" x 45" x 3 9/16" (177.8 x 114.3 x 9cm), framed
Sold
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer,
Recurrent Anaximander
2020, circular LED display, PC running custom software, internet connection, 57-1/8" (145.1 cm), diameter
Available
Robert Mangold,
Yellow Double Square / Loop,
2015
2015, acrylic and black pencil on canvas, 48" × 96" (121.9 cm × 243.8 cm)
Available
Kylie Manning,
Pyrexia,
2023
2023, oil on linen, 60" × 80-1/8" (152.4 cm × 203.5 cm)
Sold
Roberto Matta,
Beau bleu fou,
1976
1976, oil on canvas, 78-1/2" × 9' 6-1/2" (199.4 cm × 290.8 cm)
Available
William Monk,
Son of Nothing I
2023, oil on canvas, 45 cm × 70 cm (17-11/16" × 27-9/16")
Reserved
Louise Nevelson,
Moon Phases-Day IV,
1969
1969-1976, wood painted black, 35" × 36-1/2" × 5" (88.9 cm × 92.7 cm × 12.7 cm)
Sold
Louise Nevelson,
Chapel Study,
1075
c. 1975, wood painted white, 90-1/4" × 15" × 15" (229.2 cm × 38.1 cm × 38.1 cm)
Reserved
Trevor Paglen,
CLOUD #489 Progressive Probabilistic Hough Transform
2022, Dye sublimation print, 48" × 60" (121.9 cm × 152.4 cm) work 49-1/8" × 61-1/8" × 2" (124.8 cm × 155.3 cm × 5.1 cm) frame (white)
Available
Marina Perez Simão,
Untitled
2023, oil on linen, 19-11/16" × 15-3/4" (50 cm × 40 cm)
Sold
Alejandro Piñeiro Bello,
Originario
2023, oil on linen, 74" × 86" (188 cm × 218.4 cm)
Sold
Alejandro Piñeiro Bello,
Destellos En La Noche
2023, oil on linen, 36" × 46" (91.4 cm × 116.8 cm)
Sold
Julian Schnabel,
Judith and Holofernes IV
2023, oil, plates, and Bondo on wood, 48" × 36" (121.9 cm × 91.4 cm)
Sold
Joel Shapiro,
untitled,
2022
2022, painted bronze, 85" × 77" × 23" (215.9 cm × 195.6 cm × 58.4 cm)
Reserved
Arlene Shechet,
Significant Step,
2023
2023/4, bronze, black walnut, 16" × 16" × 24" (40.6 cm × 40.6 cm × 61 cm)
Available
Arlene Shechet,
Grow and Glow,
2023
2023, polished cast bronze, steel, hardwood, Overall: 40-1/2" × 19" × 4" (102.9 cm × 48.3 cm × 10.2 cm) Bronze: 14" × 19" × 14" (35.6 cm × 48.3 cm × 35.6 cm) Steel: 10-1/4" × 6" × 4" (26 cm × 15.2 cm × 10.2 cm) Wood: 22-1/4" × 16" × 13" (56.5 cm × 40.6 cm × 33 cm)
Unavailable
Kiki Smith,
Among the Flowers
2023, bronze with gold and Japanese silver leaf, Dimensions variable, 89 elements
Reserved
Mika Tajima,
Art d'Ameublement (Pointe Max Douguet),
2023
2023, Spray acrylic, thermoformed PETG, 90" × 67" (228.6 cm × 170.2 cm)
Sold
Antoni Tàpies,
Mitjons negres
2010, paint, varnish and collage on canvas, 65 cm × 81 cm × 3.5 cm (25-9/16" × 31-7/8" × 1-3/8")
Available
Antoni Tàpies,
Escrit sobre cos,
2008
2008, Paint and pencil on paper, image, 100 cm × 70.5 cm (39-3/8" × 27-3/4") framed, 105.89 x 75.56 x 4.44 cm (41-11/16 x 29-3/4 x 1-3/4'')
Available
Antoni Tàpies,
Clau de fa,
1997
1997, paint and varnish on paper, image, 56 cm × 76 cm (22-1/16" × 29-15/16") framed, 75.25 x 94.30 x 3.81 cm (29-5/8'' x 37-1/2'' x 1-1/2'')
Available
Brent Wadden,
Untitled,
2022
2022, Hand-woven fibers, wool, cotton and acrylic on canvas, image, 185 cm × 119 cm (72-13/16" × 46-7/8")
Sold
Leo Villareal,
Prism Nebula
2023, LEDs, acrylic, aluminum, electronics, custom software, 48" × 36" × 3" (121.9 cm × 91.4 cm × 7.6 cm)
Available