80676

Frieze Los Angeles

Past
Feb 17 – Feb 20, 2022
Los Angeles
 
Art Fair Details:

Frieze Los Angeles
Booth D15
Feb 17 – Feb 20, 2022

Connect:

Frieze Los Angeles
@friezeofficial
@pacegallery

Above: Sonia Gomes, Espelho, 2021 © Sonia Gomes, courtesy Mendes Wood DM and the artist

Pace Gallery is pleased to detail its presentation at the 2022 edition of Frieze Los Angeles. The gallery’s booth will reflect its robust contemporary program and commitment to supporting artists’ advanced studio practices.

Among the highlights in the booth will be a selection of works from Leo Villareal’s first series of NFTs, titled Cosmic Reef and presented in collaboration with the platform Art Blocks. The booth will also spotlight works by California artists Glenn Kaino and Richard Misrach; new paintings by Paulina Olowska, who joined the gallery in 2022, and Nigel Cooke; a Gazing Ball sculpture by Jeff Koons; new works on paper by David Byrne and Loie Hollowell; and sculptures by Sonia Gomes, Fred Wilson, and Louise Nevelson.

Digital works from Leo Villareal’s Cosmic Reef NFT series, which sold out within two hours of its debut on Art Blocks in January, feature unique combinations of geometry, color, light, and composition that explore beauty and randomness in the natural world. Layered geometries in the NFTs are the result of both human control and computational chance. In spring 2022, following the fair, Pace and Art Blocks will partner on a series of online talks hosted on Twitter and Discord. This program will kick off with a conversation between Pace President and CEO Marc Glimcher and Art Blocks Founder and CEO Erick Calderon.

Sculpture and painting by L.A.-based artist Glenn Kaino, who joined Pace in 2021, will also be on view in the gallery’s booth. These abstract works exemplify the artist’s interest in a wide range of materials and mediums. Beyond Pace’s booth, Kaino will present his monumental circular sculpture Revolutions (2022) at Frieze L.A. Revolutions features metal bars tuned to play specific musical notes when hit with a baton, and the sculpture will be activated in a series of performances throughout the fair’s run. Revolutions was inspired by protests in Selma, Alabama, and Northern Ireland, drawing connections between struggles for equality and justice across space and time. Both events that informed the sculpture are known as Bloody Sunday, and when the work’s metal bars are struck in sequence the melody from U2’s 1983 song of the same name is played. An edition of Revolutions is currently on view at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) in North Adams through September 5 as part of Kaino’s solo exhibition In the Light of a Shadow.

In the way of photography, Pace will present works by Richard Misrach, who will have a solo exhibition with the gallery in New York this spring. Misrach, a key figure in the Bay Area scene, is known for his politically resonant images of the American West. Recent works by the artist on view in Pace’s booth depict multifarious views of the ocean and body surfers amid towering waves.

Pace’s presentation of a new painting by Paulina Olowska at the fair will mark the artist’s debut with the gallery. With Artist’s Flea Market (2021), Olowska engages with her longstanding interests in the political and social histories of Eastern Europe, American consumerism and pop culture, feminism, and the aesthetics of fashion advertisements.

Also included in the booth is Jeff Koons’s 2013 sculpture Gazing Ball (Antinous-Dionysus), which features a mesmerizing blue orb atop the head of a classical bust made of plaster, and a sculpture, collage, and photograph by JR. New works on paper by artist and musician David Byrne, who is presenting a solo exhibition of drawings at Pace’s New York gallery through March 19, will be on view. Byrne often injects his understated, playful drawings with a sense of humor and wit. New works on paper by Loie Hollowell depict dynamic forms that can be understood in conversation with her famed painting practice. Sculptures by Sonia Gomes, Fred Wilson, and Louise Nevelson— including a new piece by Gomes and a mirror work by Wilson—reflect the artists’ distinct and idiosyncratic approaches to the medium.

 

Featured Works

Paulina Olowska, Artist's Flea Market, 2021, oil on canvas, 220 cm × 335 cm (86-5/8" × 10' 11-7/8")

Paulina Olowska

b. 1976, Gdansk, Poland

Paulina Olowska, who joined Pace in 2022, makes her debut with the gallery in this presentation. Olowska’s practice spans painting, collage, sculpture, video, installation, and performance. The artist’s figurative paintings often feature women in a wide range of environments, from offices and shops to farms and jungles. Deeply engaged with histories of Eastern Europe, American consumerism and pop culture, feminism, and the aesthetics of fashion advertisements, her work challenges and upends art historical conventions as well as traditional notions of femininity in Eastern and Western cultures. Olowska imbues her canvases with surreal, dreamlike effects through her distinct use of color and perspective. For a new series of paintings, including Artist’s Flea Market (2021), the artist drew on research into art spaces and educational institutions helmed by women in the US and Poland.

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (Antinous-Dionysus), 2013, plaster and glass, 60-3/8" × 44-3/8" × 27-1/2" (153.4 cm × 112.7 cm × 69.9 cm)

Jeff Koons

b. 1955, York, Pennsylvania

Nigel Cooke

b. 1973, Manchester, United Kingdom

Nigel Cooke, Sunsets, 2021, oil and acrylic on linen, 225 cm × 164 cm (88-9/16" × 64-9/16")
Nigel Cooke, Pines, 2019, oil and acrylic on linen, 88-9/16" × 64-9/16" (224.9 cm × 164 cm)

Developing an emotive and highly focused use of color, Nigel Cooke’s calligraphic images are delicately balanced, with structure and collapse held together in a state of tension. Like the present works, these paintings contrast staining techniques on raw linen with classical techniques of layering and spatial depth, indebted to both Abstract Expressionism and the figurative compositions of European Classicism. Much of the work’s revisions are visible in the final image, which play fine, schematic areas against passages of gestural impasto. Cooke’s background in masterfully executed figurative painting provides the sense of drawing and representational rendering that permeate the abstract marks.

Sonia Gomes, Espelho, 2021, different fabrics, laces, cotton threads, buttons, metal key, metal hoop, pin, mirror, crochet and knitting, 53-1/2" × 20-7/8" × 11-3/4" (135.9 cm × 53.1 cm × 29.8 cm)

Sonia Gomes

b. 1948, Caetanópolis, Brazil

Sonia Gomes is known for her abstract sculptures featuring intricate combinations of found materials, such as textiles, and wires. Espelho (2021) reflects her ability to imbue assemblages with both political and personal meaning. The hanging sculpture is comprised of fabric features of variously sized components situated atop and around one another. The elaborate layers of textured materials give the work an undulating, energized quality. Cords and tassels contribute to this sense of choreography and motion, and the sculpture’s largely subdued color palette is punctuated by bursts of vibrant green and red fabric emerging from various openings. Gomes draws inspiration from Brazilian dances as well as sacred objects of Brazil’s African diaspora. Her practice is deeply engaged with themes of memory and erased histories.

Loie Hollowell, Around the Clock, July 19, 2021, soft pastel on paper, 30-1/2" × 30-1/2" (77.5 cm × 77.5 cm)

Loie Hollowell

b. 1983, Woodland, California

Fred Wilson, I Saw Othello's Visage in His Mind, 2013, Murano glass, paint, and wood, 64" × 51-1/2" × 7-3/4" (162.6 cm × 130.8 cm × 19.7 cm)

Fred Wilson

b. 1954, Bronx, New York

Beginning with his early black glass drips—also referred to as teardrops—Fred Wilson soon pivoted toward more complex representations in glass, using the reflective quality of the medium as a formal device and a unifying element in his oeuvre. In preparation for his 2003 solo exhibition, Speak of Me As I Am, at the U.S. pavilion during the fiftieth Venice Biennale, Wilson worked with the Murano glass company to produce ornate black mirrors and create a large-scale chandelier in an eighteenth- century Venetian style—rendered for the first time in black glass. Describing one of his early chandelier sculptures, Wilson reveals: “For me, its monstrous melancholy goes hand in hand with its beauty. This sculpture, the chandelier, though designed from one first made during the Venetian Empire, can be seen as a metaphor for contemporary conundrums of power and blackness.”

Louise Nevelson, Seventh Decade Garden I, 1971, directed-welded, painted aluminum, 109" × 57" × 40" (276.9 cm × 144.8 cm × 101.6 cm)

Louise Nevelson

b. 1899, Kiev
d. 1988, New York

Glenn Kaino

b. 1972, Los Angeles, California

Glenn Kaino, Revolutions, 2022, powder coated steel and aluminum, 120" × 178" (304.8 cm × 452.1 cm)

Revolutions (2022) is a monumental sculpture and instrument inspired by the connection between global protests for equal rights. From the march on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama in 1965 to Bishops’ Field in Northern Ireland in 1972, this work explores the similarities and differences between two protests known as Bloody Sunday. Revolutions is a circular structure made from metal bars, each of which is tuned to play a specific musical note when hit with a baton. Struck in sequence, the bars play the melody from U2’s Sunday Bloody Sunday. The sculpture conjures the intimidating structures of political suppression and border divisions, transformed by Kaino from a barrier into an instrument, one that gives voice rather than suppresses it. The sculpture takes the literal form of revolution. A version of Revolutions is prominently featured in Kaino’s current solo exhibition at MASS MoCA, In the Light of a Shadow.

Revolutions

Presented in Frieze Projects
Performances:
Thursday, Feb 17, 2 PM
Saturday, Feb 19, 2 PM

We visited Kaino's Los Angeles studio, where the work was made, to speak with the artist about how Revolutions conveys the universality of the Civil Rights Movement, how artist and musician Deon Jones's own experiences informed the work's creation, and why performance is an integral part of the experience of the work.

Glenn Kaino, In Search of New Systems (Logarithmic), 2015, gold, nickel and ruthenium plated model parts, meteorite, cotton, insect pins, paint and high-density urethane, 72" × 72" × 6" (182.9 cm × 182.9 cm × 15.2 cm)

Robert Longo

b. 1953, Brooklyn, New York

Robert Longo, Study for White House, 2019, ink and charcoal on vellum, 11-15/16" × 33-1/16" (30.3 cm × 84 cm), image 26-5/8" × 46-3/8" (67.6 cm × 117.8 cm), frame

JR

b. 1983, Paris

JR JR, The Gun Chronicles: A Story of America, Work in Progress #3, USA, 2018, relief ink jet print, laser cut cardboard, vinyl, and printed duraclear, overall, 28 3/8 x 60 1/4 x 2 3/4 inches (72 x 153 x 7 cm)

Richard Misrach

b. 1949, Los Angeles, California

Richard Misrach, Icarus Suite #110, 2019, pigment print mounted to Dibond, 58" × 89-1/2" (147.3 cm × 227.3 cm), image, paper and mount 63" × 94-1/8" × 3" (160 cm × 239.1 cm × 7.6 cm), frame

Richard Misrach is known for his pioneering work with large-scale format and color photography. He began photographing the American West in the 1970s with an eye towards landscape, environmental awareness, and the politics of geography and infrastructure. The artist often photographs the same view repeatedly in different states of weather, light, and movement. The Icarus Suite series draws reference to the Greek myth of Icarus and Daedalus, in which Icarus flies too close to the sun and consequently falls into the ocean. In Icarus Suite #140 (2019), a figure is visible surfing on a wave, calling to mind this tale through the relationship of the figure and the water.

Icarus Suite

In this film, photographer Richard Misrach opens up his studios in Marin County, California to discuss the inspirations and processes that inform his Icarus Suite of photographs, on view in our presentation for Frieze Los Angeles.

Richard Misrach, Duet For Debbie #10, 2021, pigment print mounted to Dibond, 47-1/8" × 117" (119.7 cm × 297.2 cm), image, paper and mount 48-1/2" × 119-3/8" × 3" (123.2 cm × 303.2 cm × 7.6 cm), frame
David Byrne, Ancient Kingdoms & Topological Correspondences, 2004, pencil on paper, 17" × 14" (43.2 cm × 35.6 cm), paper 19" × 16" × 1-1/2" (48.3 cm × 40.6 cm × 3.8 cm), frame

David Byrne

b. 1952, Dumbarton, Scotland

 
Leo Villareal, Cosmic Reef #125, 2022, non-fungible token; Contract ID: 0xa7d8d9ef8d8ce8992df33d8b8cf4aebabd5bd270, Token ID: 250000125

Leo Villareal

Cosmic Reef
Presented by Pace Verso and Art Blocks

Pace Verso is pleased to partner with Art Blocks, the preeminent platform for generative art, in the presentation of Leo Villareal's first series of NFTs, Cosmic Reef, at Frieze Los Angeles. This collaboration marks a natural evolution in Villareal’s practice and includes the first works created by the artist to exist in a born-digital form. Drawing upon an infinite array of sequences in the natural world, Cosmic Reef, which consists of 1,024 unique NFTs, reflects on randomness in nature, which is capable of producing beauty and symmetry.

Leo Villareal, Cosmic Reef #579, 2022, non-fungible token; Contract ID: 0xa7d8d9ef8d8ce8992df33d8b8cf4aebabd5bd270, Token ID: 250000579
Leo Villareal, Cosmic Reef #152, 2022, non-fungible token; Contract ID: 0xa7d8d9ef8d8ce8992df33d8b8cf4aebabd5bd270, Token ID: 250000152
 

All Works

David Byrne,
Pattern Recognition,
2002
2002, pencil on paper, 16-7/8" × 14" (42.9 cm × 35.6 cm), paper 19" × 16" × 1-1/2" (48.3 cm × 40.6 cm × 3.8 cm), frame
Available
$8,000 USD
David Byrne,
Comfortable Restlessness,
2003
2003, pencil on paper, 17" × 14" (43.2 cm × 35.6 cm), paper 19" × 16" × 1-1/2" (48.3 cm × 40.6 cm × 3.8 cm), frame
Sold
$8,000 USD
David Byrne,
Ancient Kingdoms & Topological Correspondences,
2004
2004, pencil on paper, 17" × 14" (43.2 cm × 35.6 cm), paper 19" × 16" × 1-1/2" (48.3 cm × 40.6 cm × 3.8 cm), frame
Available
$8,000 USD
Nigel Cooke,
Sunsets
2021, oil and acrylic on linen, 225 cm × 164 cm (88-9/16" × 64-9/16")
Sold
$285,000 USD
Nigel Cooke,
Pines,
2019
2019, oil and acrylic on linen, 88-9/16" × 64-9/16" (224.9 cm × 164 cm)
Reserved
$285,000 USD
Sonia Gomes,
Espelho,
2021
2021, different fabrics, laces, cotton threads, buttons, metal key, metal hoop, pin, mirror, crochet and knitting, 53-1/2" × 20-7/8" × 11-3/4" (135.9 cm × 53.1 cm × 29.8 cm)
Sold
$150,000 USD
Loie Hollowell,
Shell we Juggle
August 9, 2021, soft pastel on paper, 21" × 26-1/2" (53.3 cm × 67.3 cm)
Sold
$45,000 USD
Loie Hollowell,
Around the Clock
July 19, 2021, soft pastel on paper, 30-1/2" × 30-1/2" (77.5 cm × 77.5 cm)
Sold
$50,000 USD
JR JR,
28 Millimètres, Women Are Heroes, Eyes on bricks, New Dehli, Inde,
2009
2009, color print, mounted on dibond, mat plexiglas, flushed wooden black frame, 49-3/16" × 74" × 2-3/4" (124.9 cm × 188 cm × 7 cm)
Available
$69,000 USD
JR JR,
The Gun Chronicles: A Story of America, Work in Progress #3, USA,
2018
2018, relief ink jet print, laser cut cardboard, vinyl, and printed duraclear, overall, 28 3/8 x 60 1/4 x 2 3/4 inches (72 x 153 x 7 cm)
Available
$90,000 USD
Glenn Kaino,
One Crisis at a Time (ATER IS LIFE, NOW!),
2021
2021, acrylic, burnt wood on canvas over panel, 61" × 49" × 3" (154.9 cm × 124.5 cm × 7.6 cm)
Available
$110,000 USD
Glenn Kaino,
Cloud Paths,
2021
2021, gold, nickel and ruthenium plated model parts, meteorite, amber, sea urchin exoskeleton, insect pins, paint and high-density urethane, 22" × 55" × 4-1/2" (55.9 cm × 139.7 cm × 11.4 cm)
Sold
$80,000 USD
Glenn Kaino,
In Search of New Systems (Logarithmic),
2015
2015, gold, nickel and ruthenium plated model parts, meteorite, cotton, insect pins, paint and high-density urethane, 72" × 72" × 6" (182.9 cm × 182.9 cm × 15.2 cm)
Sold
$90,000 USD
Glenn Kaino,
Salute (Legacy Team),
2021
2021, urethane resin, steel, wire, gold paint, glass, light, 38-1/2" × 51-1/2" × 8" (97.8 cm × 130.8 cm × 20.3 cm)
Available
$80,000 USD
Jeff Koons,
Gazing Ball (Antinous-Dionysus),
2013
2013, plaster and glass, 60-3/8" × 44-3/8" × 27-1/2" (153.4 cm × 112.7 cm × 69.9 cm)
Sold
$2,800,000 USD
Robert Longo,
Study for White House,
2019
2019, ink and charcoal on vellum, 11-15/16" × 33-1/16" (30.3 cm × 84 cm), image 26-5/8" × 46-3/8" (67.6 cm × 117.8 cm), frame
Reserved
$90,000 USD
Richard Misrach,
Icarus Suite #110,
2019
2019, pigment print mounted to Dibond, 58" × 89-1/2" (147.3 cm × 227.3 cm), image, paper and mount 63" × 94-1/8" × 3" (160 cm × 239.1 cm × 7.6 cm), frame
Sold
$70,000 USD
Richard Misrach,
Icarus Suite #140,
2019
2019, pigment print mounted to Dibond, 37" × 117" (94 cm × 297.2 cm), image, paper and mount 42" × 121-5/8" × 3-1/2" (106.7 cm × 308.9 cm × 8.9 cm), frame
Sold
$70,000 USD
Richard Misrach,
Duet For Debbie #10,
2021
2021, pigment print mounted to Dibond, 47-1/8" × 117" (119.7 cm × 297.2 cm), image, paper and mount 48-1/2" × 119-3/8" × 3" (123.2 cm × 303.2 cm × 7.6 cm), frame
Sold
$70,000 USD
Louise Nevelson,
Seventh Decade Garden I,
1971
1971, directed-welded, painted aluminum, 109" × 57" × 40" (276.9 cm × 144.8 cm × 101.6 cm)
Sold
$0 USD
Paulina Olowska,
Artist's Flea Market
2021, oil on canvas, 220 cm × 335 cm (86-5/8" × 10' 11-7/8")
Sold
$200,000 USD
Marina Perez Simão,
Untitled,
2021
2021, watercolor on paper, 16-1/8" × 12-3/16" (41 cm × 31 cm)
Sold
$12,000 USD
Marina Perez Simão,
Untitled,
2021
2021, watercolor on paper, 16-3/8" × 11-5/8" (42 cm × 29.7 cm), paper
Sold
$12,000 USD
Marina Perez Simão,
Untitled,
2021
2021, watercolor on paper, 16-1/8" × 12-3/16" (41 cm × 31 cm), paper
Sold
$8,500 USD
Fred Wilson,
I Saw Othello's Visage in His Mind,
2013
2013, Murano glass, paint, and wood, 64" × 51-1/2" × 7-3/4" (162.6 cm × 130.8 cm × 19.7 cm)
Sold
$185,000 USD
Fred Wilson,
Slow Swill,
2021
2021, blown glass, 63" × 20-1/4" × 2-7/8" (160 cm × 51.4 cm × 7.3 cm)
Available
$80,000 USD
To inquire about any of the works or artists featured in this presentation, please email us at inquiries@pacegallery.com.