PACE Galleries

Richard Tuttle

Looking for the Map

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About Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

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Press Release

  • Looking for the Map

    New York—Pace Gallery announces a solo exhibition of new work by Richard Tuttle on view at 32 East 57 Street from February 7th to March 15th. This year will mark the 50th Anniversary of Tuttle's first solo show in New York which was held at the Betty Parsons Gallery. In the Pace exhibition, Richard Tuttle will present the drawings and studies he created in preparation for his forthcoming commission for Tate Modern’s renowned Turbine Hall opening in October 2014.

    Richard Tuttle, a collector of textiles from around the world, has focused and expanded his knowledge beyond his collection to understanding the material from its inherent qualities to the extrinsic factors caused by the chemistry of the dyeing process. As the 2012-13 Artist in Residence at the Getty, Tuttle used the occasion to design three textiles and he recently traveled to India to have them fabricated. This material will inform and serve as the foundation for his upcoming exhibitions.

    Richard Tuttle revolutionized sculpture in the 1960s by challenging preconceived notions of the genre through his use of everyday materials such as paper, rope, plywood and cloth. While first utilizing cloth, Tuttle's experiments led him to make a variety of irregular shaped canvases that were dyed and stitched. This ongoing exploration began with First Green Octagonal (1967), an early work conceived as a drawing of a three-dimensional structure in space. Tuttle reflected about the 1967 works in a recent conversation with Tate Modern Director Chris Dercon, "I would choose a material and look at it to try and get out of it the thing that both satisfied my interest and explored that material simultaneously."

    The Tate Modern commission will be Tuttle's largest to date spanning nearly 40 feet in length. Featuring the textiles he designed and fabricated, the work will be suspended from the ceiling in contrast to the Hall’s industrial architecture. The Tate Modern commission will be on view from October 14, 2014 through April 6, 2015 and will coincide with a two month exhibition of the artist’s work at Whitechapel Gallery from October 14 through December 14, 2014. The multi-venue exhibition, I Don’t Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language, will celebrate the largest survey exhibition of the artist’s work in the UK. I Don’t Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language is curated by Magnus af Petersens, Chief Curator of Whitechapel Gallery and Achim Borchardt-Hume, Head of Exhibitions of Tate Modern with Poppy Bowers, Assistant Curator, Whitechapel Gallery and Loren Hansi Momodu, Assistant Curator, Tate Modern.

    A new book, published by the Tate, will examine the historical and sociocultural value of textiles and the artist’s own personal collection will accompany the UK exhibition.

    Looking for the Map is the artist’s fourth solo exhibition with Pace Gallery.

    Richard Tuttle (b. 1941) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work from painting, sculpture and assemblage to poetry and drawing. He extracts beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world. His investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience.

    Tuttle has been the subject of hundreds of solo exhibitions since 1965, including numerous museum surveys, ranging from his first, at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1975, to more recently, a two-year travelling retrospective organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2005-2007). Tuttle has also been included in the prestigious group exhibitions, the Venice biennale (1976, 1997, 2001) and the Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial (1977, 1987, 2000).

    Most recently, Richard Tuttle’s work was the subject of a 2012 exhibition with poet and wife Mei-mei Berssenbrugge entitled Hello, The Roses at Kunstverein Munich. Solo exhibitions of the artist’s work were also presented by Bergen Kunsthall in Norway and The Pinakothek der Moderne Munich in fall 2012. In 2013, Richard Tuttle was included in the Fondazione Prada’s presentation of When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013, based on the seminal Swiss exhibition curated by Harald Szeeman. His work was recently included in The Morgan Museum & Library’s exhibition, Modern Drawings: Selections from the Howard Karshan Collection during fall 2013.

    Richard Tuttle’s work is held nearly every major collection worldwide, including in Europe at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Tate, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Switzerland; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, and Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, among many others. In 2012, Tuttle was elected to the National Academy and in 2013 he was invited to become a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Richard Tuttle lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

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On Thursday, February 6, Pace Gallery opened Richard Tuttle's "Looking for the Map" at 32 East 57th Street. The show will remain open through March 15. 

Catalogues

RICHARD TUTTLE: LOOKING FOR THE MAP

Richard Tuttle

2014. Pace Gallery. Portfolio.

Portfolio (30 leaves): 11 ¾ x 9 ¾ inches

$15.00

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