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刘建华

Liu Jianhua

About 刘建华

劉建華(生於1962年,吉安,中國)以陶瓷和綜合材料為媒介,是中國著名的雕塑和裝置藝術家。他生長於江西吉安市並在以陶瓷著名的景德鎮生活、工作、學習了14年之久。劉建華的作品反映了近年來不斷困擾中國的經濟和社會變化等系列問題。2005年,劉建華與藝術家洪浩、蕭昱、宋冬、劉建華、以及策展人冷林一同組建了中國重要藝術小組「政純辦」。劉建華作品被眾多國際知名藝術機構收藏,其中包括:倫敦泰特現代美術館;倫敦維多利亞和阿爾伯特博物館;紐約現代藝術博物館;紐約古根海姆美術館;悉尼新南威爾士博物館;巴黎路易威登藝術基金會;舊金山亞洲藝術博物館;日本十和田市美術館;北京今日美術館;上海余德耀藝術基金會;深圳美術館、廣東美術館。他的裝置作品曾參展過2017年威尼斯雙年展。

Press Release

  • Liu Jianhua

    Palo Alto—Pace Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of sculptures by Liu Jianhua. The exhibition will focus on Liu’s mastery of porcelain, a medium he has been ceaselessly pushing the boundaries of since 1977, when he began working as an apprentice in the Jingdezhen Pottery and Porcelain Sculpture Factory, the oldest established center of ceramic production in China. Significant recent series in the artist’s oeuvre will be on display, including Trace (2011); Square (2014), which was featured in the 2017 Venice Biennale Viva Arte Viva; and Blank Paper (2009-16). The artist’s first solo exhibition with Pace Gallery in the U.S., Liu Jianhua will be on view from June 21 to August 4, 2019 at Pace Gallery at 229 Hamilton Ave, Palo Alto. An opening reception for the artist will be held on Thursday, June 20 from 4–7 pm.

    The series of works included in this exhibition underscore the artist’s increasingly philosophical approach toward form and abstraction that has characterized his practice over the last decade. Full distillations of form resulted in the Blank Paper series, thin sheets of white porcelain hung on the wall. Uncannily realistic in their mimicry of pristine sheets of paper, the works demand more than a perfunctory glance to see they are made of porcelain. However, in the process of discovering the sculptures’ true medium, assessments and assumptions are reevaluated and the viewer is able to reconsider the form of objects free from preconceptions of their function. Though the works allow for revelations, they offer the viewer no grand narratives, rather inviting people to make their own impressions.

    Other highlights of the exhibition include Trace, a series of wall-bound black porcelain ink drops, which are inspired by wo lou hen, a calligraphy stroke that can be translated to “traces from a leaking roof.” The sculptures play off of both wo lou hen’s figurative inspiration and calligraphic origins by returning the brushstrokes back to their architectural context, while transforming the walls of the gallery into immense sheets of paper at the artist’s disposal. This transformation is made complete by the lustrous black porcelain Liu expertly employs—in his hands the material appears viscous and weighty, threatening to drip down the walls. Trace ultimately led to the final series on view, Square, an installation comprised of gold-glazed porcelain pools resting on top of steel sheets, which was most recently shown in Viva Arte Viva at the 57th Venice Biennale (2017). Liu further flexes his unsurpassed dexterity with porcelain by seemingly turning fragile material into delicate liquid pools of precious metal. Though the works are undeniably sumptuous, they present a clean cogent aesthetic with a strong eye for form and material that has defined Liu Jianhua’s recent work.