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弗雷德 威尔逊

Afro Kismet

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About 弗雷德 威尔逊

弗雷德·威尔森(b. 1954,布朗克斯)曾与北美、加勒比地区、欧洲、中东以及亚洲地区的博物馆和文化机构合作创作特定场地装置艺术。他的作品鼓励观众重新审视、思考社会与历史的叙述,同时引发关于政治移除与排斥的批判性思索。从他在马里兰历史学会举办的史无前例并广受好评的展览“挖掘博物馆”开始, 弗雷德·威尔森比较并且重新定义现有的物件来进行新创造来改变这些物件本身的原有含义。 2003 年,威尔森代表美国参加第50 届威尼斯双年展,并举办个人展览“弗雷德·威尔森:说起我自己”。他曾获得众多荣誉,其中包括约翰和凯萨琳麦克纳瑟基金会天才奖金(1999)。
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Press Release

  • Afro Kismet

    London—Pace Gallery is pleased to present Fred Wilson: Afro Kismet, an exhibition featuring the artist’s most recent body of work originally produced for the 15th Istanbul Biennial in the autumn of 2017. The exhibition will be Wilson’s first at Pace London. On the occasion of Afro Kismet, Pace will publish a catalogue that will include an introduction by artist duo and Istanbul Biennial curators Elmgreen & Dragset, an essay by the Biennial’s Director Bige Örer, and an interview with the artist conducted by American novelist, playwright and essayist Darryl Pinckney.

    The genesis of the exhibition stretches back to 1992 when Wilson presented Re:Claiming Egypt, at the 4th International Cairo Biennale and to 2003 when Wilson represented the United States at the 50th Venice Biennale with Speak of Me as I Am. Wilson’s interest in Istanbul had been piqued for a long time; he conceived of the city as the third leg in a historically and culturally connected eastern Mediterranean triangle which also included Cairo and Venice. Through his research, Wilson developed a conceptual basis for the Istanbul project in which he contextualized pieces from the city’s Pera Museum’s Orientalist collection with new and existing works of his own. "My work is about an issue which is both personal and universal. […] A new meaning emerges from the coming together of art and history […] bring[ing] a fresh perspective to things we are used to seeing in museums. You can say that I tell a history which is not adequately discussed…” Fred Wilson, 2017.

    For Pace, Wilson will reconfigure Afro Kismet which includes two chandeliers, two monumental Iznik tile walls, four black glass drip works, and a globe sculpture, as well as installations and vitrine pieces that gather cowrie shells, engravings, photographs, a Yoruba mask, and furniture, among other objects that the artist discovered in his frequent trips to Istanbul throughout 2016 and 2017. Since Venice Biennale in 2003, Wilson’s Murano glass chandeliers, with their shifts in scale, color, and complexity, have become vehicles for the artist’s meditations on blackness, death, and beauty. New chandeliers, included in the exhibition, combine black Murano glass with traditional metal and glass elements of Ottoman chandeliers, thus fusing two histories of craftsmanship and symbolizing the complex relationship between the Venetian and Ottoman Empires.

    Throughout the exhibition, Wilson utilizes alluring materials—from richly coloured tiles walls to luminescent glass—to represent and investigate the long-ignored presence of communities of African descent in Turkey. In the two Iznik tile walls, the Arabic calligraphy translates in one case to “Mother Africa” and in the other “Black is Beautiful”. The new globe sculpture titled “Trade Winds” refers not to its original meaning, related to weather patterns, but to the complex and tragic global trade in human beings. The juxtaposition of recent works by Wilson with works from the 19th century – including Orientalist paintings with African subject matter by Alfred De Dreux and William James Müller – not only questions notions of universal knowledge and truth, but also sheds light on a history not thoroughly examined. By combining contemporary objects and museum-quality artefacts, Wilson challenges the assumptions of exhibition methodology and art historical scholarship.

    Afro Kismet will be on view at Pace Gallery in London, from 23 March – 28 April 2018, with an opening reception on 22 March from 6 – 8 pm. The exhibition will be on view at 510 West 25 Street from 10 July – 17 August 2018, with an opening reception on 10 July from 6 – 8 pm.

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