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From Keith Tyson to Anish Kapoor, This Summer's 8 Must-See Paris Shows

Winner of the 2002 Turner Prize, Keith Tyson has said that in his "Contemporary Grotesques" series he is trying to "create a series of grotesques as contemporary gargoyles." The statues raise the dual specter of ambition and failure, whether dealing with strength and skill (a geisha riding a walrus while doing calligraphy, or a cowboy struggling to rope a calf), sickness and obsession (an anorexic dancer, a pair of bodybuilding lovers), and ideas of normalcy and the abnormal (a mother with three children, or three dwarfs urinating into a bucket). Tyson's work questions good and evil, acceptance and rejection, and the power and fragility of human existence. Made of polycarbonate, the sculptures are coated with graphite, giving them the look of classical works — which makes them all the more disturbing, due to the contrast between the technical beauty of the pieces and the ugliness or weakness that they so often depict. Through July 31.
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