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    Richard Tuttle at Tate Modern

    Tate Modern's Turbine Hall presents a new commission by Richard Tuttle, entitled I Don't Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language. Featuring Tuttle's textiles, the installation coincides with Whitechapel Gallery's retrospective of the artist's work from the 1960s to the present. These two displays comprise the United Kingdom's largest-ever survey of Richard Tuttle.

     

    As Tuttle has emphasized, the creation of the fabric is integral to understanding the work, which features rich fabrics produced by a textile firm in Gujarat, India that were then attached to a monumental plywood frame. “I guess the job of an artist is to try to find a healthy union of the mechanical and the human,” the artist said.

    Paul Graham book signing on 30 October at Waterstones in Trafalgar Square, London

    Pace artist Paul Graham will be in London signing copies of Does Yellow Run Forever?, the catalogue of his recent exhibition at Pace, 25th Street in New York (5 September - 4 October 2014).

    VIDEO: Keith Tyson interviewed at the David Risley Gallery in Denmark

    Turner prize winner Keith Tyson spoke about his work at his recent solo show A Mystery to Myself in Copenhagen.

     

    Featured on the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art’s website, the Danish contemporary museum highlighted Tyson’s wide ranging exhibition.

    Maya Lin Awarded Gish Prize

    Pace is pleased to announce that Maya Lin will receive the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, a prestigious award given to a person “who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life. “Chosen from 100 nominees in the arts, Lin will use the $300,000 prize to continue her work on “What Is Missing?,” an ongoing project that raises awareness about the loss of biodiversity and natural habitats.

     

    The 2014 selection committee chair, playwright David Henry Hwang, said in a statement, “Ms. Lin’s combination of artistic excellence and public advocacy embodies the Gish sisters’ vision to honor an artist who makes our world a better place.” The Gish Prize will be presented to Maya Lin on the evening of Wednesday, November 12, 2014 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

    The Chinati Foundation announces plans for major Robert Irwin Installation

    Pioneer of the Light and Space movement, Robert Irwin has begun contruction on a major new project at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas.

     

    On being drawn to the Marfa landscape, Irwin tells the The Los Angeles Times: "It's in the middle of nowhere, but there's something enchanting about it."

    Louise Nevelson Sculpture Returns to Park Avenue

    After over three years of restoration work, Louise Nevelson’s Night Presence IV has been reinstalled at its home on Park Avenue near 92nd Street. The steel sculpture, measuring at 22-feet tall, is known as “one of the crown jewels” in New York City’s public art collection, and was originally donated by the artist in honor of her 50th anniversary of living and working in the city.

     

    The conservation work was realized with support from Pace’s Milly Glimcher, who maintained a close relationship with Nevelson from 1964 until the artist’s death in 1988. As Lindsay Gellman of The Wall Street Journal writes, Glimcher “recalls that [in 1973] not all neighborhood residents were pleased with the sculpture at the time of its original installation. ‘But it has come to be very much loved.’”

     

    Read more from The Wall Street Journal here.

    Public Art Fund Presents Sui Jianguo Sculptures in New York this Fall

    Blind Portraits, an exhibition presenting four monumental sculptures by Beijing-based artist Sui Jianguo, will be on view New York’s Doris C. Freedman Plaza from October 28, 2014 through February 20, 2015. Organized by Public Art Fund, the exhibition will feature bronze works that “may first look like giant, tactile lumps,” as Carol Vogel of The New York Times writes, “but on closer inspection each has a form reminiscent of human features.”

    Pace Hong Kong opens Xie Molin

    On Thursday 18 September, Pace Hong Kong opened Xie Molin at 15C Entertainement Building. The exhibition will be on view until 25 October.

    Alexander Calder at the Seagram Building

    Beginning on October 5, three monumental sculptures by Alexander Calder will be on view at the Seagram Building at 375 Park Avenue, New York, as part of a collaboration between Pace and the Calder Foundation. The presentation coincides with Storm King Art Center’s annual gala on October 8, which is honoring the foundation and its president, Alexander S.C. Rower, the artist’s grandson.

     

    Made possible by Aby Rosen, RFR Holding LLC, the installation will include 3 Flèches Blanches (1965), Angulaire (1974), and Saurien (1976). As Randy Kennedy of The New York Times writes, the architecture “of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and the sculpture of Alexander Calder have always seemed to go together, like ham and eggs.” Calder’s works will be on display on the building’s plaza through November 10.

     

    Read more from The New York Times here.

    Pace artists displayed at the Collection Lambert, in Avignon

    Vik Muniz, Kiki Smith, Adam Pendleton and Loris Gréaud are featured in the Collection Lambert’s ambitious project begun late May 2014 entitled The Disappearance of the Fireflies, an exhibition staged at the emblematic heritage site of Avignon, in the South of France, the Sainte-Anne Prison. Kiki Smith’s Girl with Globe, 1998, is among the highlights.

    The Disappearance of the Fireflies remains on view until 25 November 2014. More details are available here

    Bosco Sodi Opens Casa Wabi in Puerto Escondido, Mexico

    This month Brooklyn-based Mexican artist Bosco Sodi will open Casa Wabi, a creative refuge for artists and an education center for the community, in Puerto Escondido, Mexico. With minimalist structures designed by Japanese architect Tadao Ando and an 8,000-square-foot art gallery, the complex is a manifestation of wabi, which translates from the Japanese as “humility.” As Elisa Lipsky-Karasz of The Wall Street Journal writes, the compound’s “simple, open design confronts the natural elements of sun, sky, water and land, encouraging visitors to lapse into Thoreau-like reflection.”

     

    Read more from The Wall Street Journal here.

    President Obama awards James Turrell the National Medal of Arts

    This week, President Obama awarded James Turrell the National Medal of Arts. The U.S. President told the recipients that their "accomplishments enrich our lives and reveal something about ourselves and our country."

    The video of the ceremony is available here.

    Pace Menlo Park Pop-Up Now Open through 2014

    The gallery is thrilled to announce that Pace Menlo Park has been extended through the end of 2014. 

     

    In an interview with BlouinArtinfo, Pace President, Marc Glimcher said, "It’s a fresh group of people with a great energy. They’re really interested in what the artists are trying to accomplish. Conversations here are about the art, the artists, history.”

    • VIDEO: Keith Tyson interviewed at the David Risley Gallery in Denmark

      Turner prize winner Keith Tyson spoke about his work at his recent solo show A Mystery to Myself in Copenhagen.

       

      Featured on the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art’s website, the Danish contemporary museum highlighted Tyson’s wide ranging exhibition.

    • Paul Graham book signing on 30 October at Waterstones in Trafalgar Square, London

      Pace artist Paul Graham will be in London signing copies of Does Yellow Run Forever?, the catalogue of his recent exhibition at Pace, 25th Street in New York (5 September - 4 October 2014).

    • Richard Tuttle at Tate Modern

      Tate Modern's Turbine Hall presents a new commission by Richard Tuttle, entitled I Don't Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language. Featuring Tuttle's textiles, the installation coincides with Whitechapel Gallery's retrospective of the artist's work from the 1960s to the present. These two displays comprise the United Kingdom's largest-ever survey of Richard Tuttle.

       

      As Tuttle has emphasized, the creation of the fabric is integral to understanding the work, which features rich fabrics produced by a textile firm in Gujarat, India that were then attached to a monumental plywood frame. “I guess the job of an artist is to try to find a healthy union of the mechanical and the human,” the artist said.

    • Maya Lin Awarded Gish Prize

      Pace is pleased to announce that Maya Lin will receive the 21st annual Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, a prestigious award given to a person “who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life. “Chosen from 100 nominees in the arts, Lin will use the $300,000 prize to continue her work on “What Is Missing?,” an ongoing project that raises awareness about the loss of biodiversity and natural habitats.

       

      The 2014 selection committee chair, playwright David Henry Hwang, said in a statement, “Ms. Lin’s combination of artistic excellence and public advocacy embodies the Gish sisters’ vision to honor an artist who makes our world a better place.” The Gish Prize will be presented to Maya Lin on the evening of Wednesday, November 12, 2014 at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

    • Louise Nevelson Sculpture Returns to Park Avenue

      After over three years of restoration work, Louise Nevelson’s Night Presence IV has been reinstalled at its home on Park Avenue near 92nd Street. The steel sculpture, measuring at 22-feet tall, is known as “one of the crown jewels” in New York City’s public art collection, and was originally donated by the artist in honor of her 50th anniversary of living and working in the city.

       

      The conservation work was realized with support from Pace’s Milly Glimcher, who maintained a close relationship with Nevelson from 1964 until the artist’s death in 1988. As Lindsay Gellman of The Wall Street Journal writes, Glimcher “recalls that [in 1973] not all neighborhood residents were pleased with the sculpture at the time of its original installation. ‘But it has come to be very much loved.’”

       

      Read more from The Wall Street Journal here.

    • Alexander Calder at the Seagram Building

      Beginning on October 5, three monumental sculptures by Alexander Calder will be on view at the Seagram Building at 375 Park Avenue, New York, as part of a collaboration between Pace and the Calder Foundation. The presentation coincides with Storm King Art Center’s annual gala on October 8, which is honoring the foundation and its president, Alexander S.C. Rower, the artist’s grandson.

       

      Made possible by Aby Rosen, RFR Holding LLC, the installation will include 3 Flèches Blanches (1965), Angulaire (1974), and Saurien (1976). As Randy Kennedy of The New York Times writes, the architecture “of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and the sculpture of Alexander Calder have always seemed to go together, like ham and eggs.” Calder’s works will be on display on the building’s plaza through November 10.

       

      Read more from The New York Times here.

    • Bosco Sodi Opens Casa Wabi in Puerto Escondido, Mexico

      This month Brooklyn-based Mexican artist Bosco Sodi will open Casa Wabi, a creative refuge for artists and an education center for the community, in Puerto Escondido, Mexico. With minimalist structures designed by Japanese architect Tadao Ando and an 8,000-square-foot art gallery, the complex is a manifestation of wabi, which translates from the Japanese as “humility.” As Elisa Lipsky-Karasz of The Wall Street Journal writes, the compound’s “simple, open design confronts the natural elements of sun, sky, water and land, encouraging visitors to lapse into Thoreau-like reflection.”

       

      Read more from The Wall Street Journal here.

    • Public Art Fund Presents Sui Jianguo Sculptures in New York this Fall

      Blind Portraits, an exhibition presenting four monumental sculptures by Beijing-based artist Sui Jianguo, will be on view New York’s Doris C. Freedman Plaza from October 28, 2014 through February 20, 2015. Organized by Public Art Fund, the exhibition will feature bronze works that “may first look like giant, tactile lumps,” as Carol Vogel of The New York Times writes, “but on closer inspection each has a form reminiscent of human features.”