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Pace Galleries

Lucas Samaras

ADAA: The Art Show

Box #86, 1973. mixed media, 9-1/4" x 12-1/2" x 15" (23.5 cm x 31.8 cm x 38.1 cm).

Box #86, 1973. mixed media, 9-1/4" x 12-1/2" x 15" (23.5 cm x 31.8 cm x 38.1 cm).

Box # 99, 1977. mixed media, 14-3/8" x 14-5/8" x 14-1/2" (36.5 cm x 37.1 cm x 36.8 cm), open; 7-7/8" x 14-5/8" x 11-5/8" (20 cm x 37.1 cm x 29.5 cm), closed.

Box # 99, 1977. mixed media, 14-3/8" x 14-5/8" x 14-1/2" (36.5 cm x 37.1 cm x 36.8 cm), open; 7-7/8" x 14-5/8" x 11-5/8" (20 cm x 37.1 cm x 29.5 cm), closed.

Box #7, 1963. mixed media, 16" x 37" x 17" (40.6 cm x 94 cm x 43.2 cm), open; 16" x 24-1/2" x 10" (40.6 cm x 62.2 cm x 25.4 cm), closed.

Box #7, 1963. mixed media, 16" x 37" x 17" (40.6 cm x 94 cm x 43.2 cm), open; 16" x 24-1/2" x 10" (40.6 cm x 62.2 cm x 25.4 cm), closed.

Box #4, 1963. mixed media, 18-1/2" x 15-1/2" x 12" (47 cm x 39.4 cm x 30.5 cm), open; 11" x 15-1/2" x 12" (27.9 cm x 39.4 cm x 30.5 cm), closed.

Box #4, 1963. mixed media, 18-1/2" x 15-1/2" x 12" (47 cm x 39.4 cm x 30.5 cm), open; 11" x 15-1/2" x 12" (27.9 cm x 39.4 cm x 30.5 cm), closed.
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About Lucas Samaras

Lucas Samaras (b. 1936, Kastoria, Macedonia, Greece) has been the subject of more than one-hundred solo exhibitions and seven major career retrospectives, including Unrepentant Ego: The Self-Portraits of Lucas Samaras at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, in 2004, which featured a staggering 400 works. In 2009, Samaras represented Greece at the Venice Biennale with an exhibition that spanned four decades of the artist’s practice. Over the years, Samaras has created drawings, furniture, jewelry, paintings, photographs, sculpture and room-sized installation using a variety of material including beads, chicken wire, clay, Cor-ten steel, fabric, mirrors, pastel, pencil, pins, plaster and oil. He has often made himself the subject of his own work, using his own image to push the boundaries of physical and psychological transformation.

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Press Release

  • Pins - Boxes - Beads

    Booth B1

    March 2–6, 2016

    New York—Pace Gallery is pleased to announce its participation in The Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory with a solo presentation of works from the 1960s and 1970s by Lucas Samaras. Featuring important early assemblages by Samaras, the presentation continues the gallery’s sixteen-year tradition of dedicating its booth at the fair to a single artist.

    Throughout his career, Samaras has been a pioneer, consistently defying conventions by turning to materials and processes, including Photoshop and Polaroid film, that few artists had employed before him. In the 1960s, he began making assemblages using readily available materials such as pins, colored yarn, razors, jewelry and other glittery commercial objects. These materials and objects constitute what Samaras has called a “five-and-dime aesthetic” that contrasted concurrent trends in art—Minimalism and the clarity of Pop—but resonates with subsequent generations of artists. The presentation at The Art Show will highlight the artist’s early assemblages, objects and boxes.

    Lucas Samaras (b. 1936, Kastoria, Greece) was a key figure in the Happenings of the late 1950s and early 1960s, collaborating with Robert Whitman and participating in Allan Kaprow’s 18 Happenings in 6 Parts in 1959. Samaras went on to be an early vanguard in assemblage, Polaroid film, and digitally manipulated photography. He was featured in William C. Seitz’s exhibition The Art of Assemblage (1961) at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Since then, Samaras’s work has been exhibited and collected widely. In 1971, the artist’s boxes were surveyed in an exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. His box and pin works have also been featured in his retrospectives at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (1972 and 2003) and the National Gallery of Greece (2005) as well as in Offerings from a Restless Soul at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (2014).

    Lucas Samaras lives and works in New York City. He has been represented by Pace since 1966.

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