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Pace Galleries

Richard Tuttle

Frieze New York

Richard Tuttle Aspect II, 2015. archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2.

Richard Tuttle Aspect II, 2015. archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2.

Richard Tuttle Aspect IV, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, watercolor, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2" (82.6 cm x 66 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect IV, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, watercolor, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2" (82.6 cm x 66 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect XII, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, gesso, watercolor, graphite, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect XII, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, gesso, watercolor, graphite, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect VIII, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, gesso, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect VIII, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, gesso, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect IX, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, watercolor, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect IX, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, watercolor, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 26" x 32-1/2" x 1-1/2" (66 cm x 82.6 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect X, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, pigment dye, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2" (82.6 cm x 66 cm x 3.8 cm).

Richard Tuttle Aspect X, 2015. Archival watercolor paper, cardboard backing material, acrylic, pigment dye, maple wood, and furniture-grade lacquer, 32-1/2" x 26" x 1-1/2" (82.6 cm x 66 cm x 3.8 cm).
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About Richard Tuttle

Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle was the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

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Press Release

  • Pace Presents Richard Tuttle at Frieze New York

    New York—Pace is pleased to announce its inaugural appearance in the Frieze New York art fair with a solo presentation of new drawings by Richard Tuttle. Since the 1960s, Tuttle has challenged conventions of genre and media, sensitizing viewers to the experience of looking with his work. This new series of drawings, titled Aspects, were completed in Maine in the summer of 2014 and evince Tuttle’s interest in formal properties of line and scale. In each work—a cut sheet from an artist’s drawing pad mounted on its cardboard backing—he employs gestures with paint, graphite, line, or the shadow of the paper on its cardboard ground that resonate with his expanded notion of drawing.

    For Frieze New York, Tuttle has conceived of the stand as an immersive environment—what he calls a pavilion. Both the interior and exterior walls will be painted black, and his red-framed drawings will be exhibited with a white band surrounding them. Twelve purple, ovoid forms will be spray-painted onto the specially designed Masonite floor. The environment creates a hermetic space that envelops the viewer, heightening the intimacy of the experience with these drawings.

    The presentation at Frieze follows Tuttle’s recent commission at the Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, which coincided with a survey of his textile works at the Whitechapel Gallery. The survey, as well as a retrospective of his prints organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, will both open at the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, on May 15. Also in May, the Pulitzer Art Foundation, St. Louis, will present a solo exhibition of Tuttle’s seminal 1972 wire pieces from May 1 to September 12.

    Richard Tuttle (b. 1941, Rahway, New Jersey) has been the subject of more than two-hundred solo exhibitions during his career, ranging from his first museum exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, curated by Marcia Tucker (1975), to his travelling retrospective organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2005). Tuttle’s work has been included in numerous important group shows including Documenta (1972, 1977, 1982) and the Venice Biennale (1976, 1997, 2001); his work is represented in the collections of more than fifty institutions worldwide. His work will be included in the five-artist exhibition Drawing Redefined, opening October 1 at the de Cordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA.

    Richard Tuttle lives and works in Abiquiu, New Mexico; Mount Desert, Maine; and New York.

    For press inquiries, please contact: Jennifer Joy, Sutton PR, +1 212 202 3402 or jen@suttonpr.com.

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News

Tate Modern's Turbine Hall presents a new commission by Richard Tuttle, entitled I Don't Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language. Featuring Tuttle's textiles, the installation coincides with Whitechapel Gallery's retrospective of the artist's work from the 1960s to the present. These two displays comprise the United Kingdom's largest-ever survey of Richard Tuttle.   As Tuttle has emphasized, the creation of the fabric is integral to understanding the work, which features rich fabrics produced

News

On Thursday, February 6, Pace Gallery opened Richard Tuttle's "Looking for the Map" at 32 East 57th Street. The show will remain open through March 15. 

In this video, filmed during Art Basel Miami Beach in 2012. Richard Tuttle and Tate Modern director Chris Dercon discuss the signifiance of textiles.  Pace Gallery will open Richard Tuttle's "Studies" and Drawings for Turbine Hall on February 7 at 32 East 57th Street featuring preparatory work for the artist's commission for the Tate Modern's Turbine Hall.