-->

Pace Galleries

Group Exhibition

ArtRio

Zhang Huan Zhang Huan, Spring Poppy Fields No.32, 2014, 2014. oil on linen, 250 cm x 400 cm x 7 cm (98-7/16" x 157-1/2" x 2-3/4").

Zhang Huan Zhang Huan, Spring Poppy Fields No.32, 2014, 2014. oil on linen, 250 cm x 400 cm x 7 cm (98-7/16" x 157-1/2" x 2-3/4").

Alexander Calder, Black-Rimmed Red, 1971. gouache and ink on paper, 43-1/4" x 29-1/2" (109.9 cm x 74.9 cm).

Alexander Calder, Black-Rimmed Red, 1971. gouache and ink on paper, 43-1/4" x 29-1/2" (109.9 cm x 74.9 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1972. gouache and ink on paper, 29-1/2" x 43-1/4" (74.9 cm x 109.9 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1972. gouache and ink on paper, 29-1/2" x 43-1/4" (74.9 cm x 109.9 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled , 1947. gouache on paper, 11-1/8" x 11-1/4" (28.3 cm x 28.6 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled , 1947. gouache on paper, 11-1/8" x 11-1/4" (28.3 cm x 28.6 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1947. gouache on paper, 22-3/4" x 30-3/4" (57.8 cm x 78.1 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1947. gouache on paper, 22-3/4" x 30-3/4" (57.8 cm x 78.1 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 13" x 10-1/4" (33 cm x 26 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 13" x 10-1/4" (33 cm x 26 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 11" x 22-3/4" (27.9 cm x 57.8 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 11" x 22-3/4" (27.9 cm x 57.8 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 11-3/4" x 15-1/2" (29.8 cm x 39.4 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 11-3/4" x 15-1/2" (29.8 cm x 39.4 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 9-1/2" x 12" (24.1 cm x 30.5 cm).

Alexander Calder, Untitled, 1949. gouache on paper, 9-1/2" x 12" (24.1 cm x 30.5 cm).

View More

Press Release

  • ArtRio 2014

    Pace is pleased to announce its return to ArtRio at the Pier Mauá in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from September 10 to 14, 2014. The gallery’s presentation (Booth 16, Hall 3) will feature a selection of works on paper, paintings, photography and sculptures by Alexander Calder, Tara Donovan, Donald Judd, Lee Ufan, Yoshimoto Nara, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Zhang Huan.

    Lee Ufan’s Dialogue (2008) from the artist’s eponymous series started in 2006 invokes his interest in Eastern philosophy and continues in the tradition of his earlier paintings. In the work, the artist applies a gradient of oil pigments to a broad brush, with tonalities ranging from white to grey. He marks the canvas with a single, deliberate stroke, leaving a square of paint whose lighter hues almost fade into the canvas’s expanse of white. The minimal gesture enlivens the large, empty canvas, enacting a play between absence and presence. The South Korean artist, who was a leading figure in Japan’s Mono-ha (“Object School”) group, was selected for the prestigious Versailles contemporary art program this year. His exhibition remains on view at the Château de Versailles, France through November 2.

    In contrast to Lee Ufan’s stark Dialogue, the booth will include a selection of vibrant Spring Poppy Field paintings by Zhang Huan. Thick impasto swaths of teal, pink, blue and green applied in an almost pointillist style pulsate across the crowded linen canvas, which on closer inspection reveal themselves to be skulls. The paintings have been a focus of the artist’s practice since 2011 and continue his career-long engagement with Buddhist iconography and the human body. This presentation coincides with a solo exhibition of his monumental sculptures at Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, New York and follows an acclaimed survey of the artist’s work across mediums since 1994 at Pace Chesa Büsin, Zuoz, Switzerland.

    Pace’s presentation will also include gouaches by Alexander Calder made in the late 1940s and early 1970s. The gouaches exemplify Calder’s commitment to geometric abstraction and a purity of form, rendering biomorphic shapes in bold fields of color and sharply defined lines. These works illustrate and helped establish many of the principles that guided Calder’s entire oeuvre, and resonate with the formal language of his mobiles and stabiles. In 1948, during his first visit to the country on the occasion of a solo exhibition in Rio de Janeiro, Calder became influenced by Brazilian artists, intellectuals, and culture.

    Tara Donovan finds common cause with Calder’s inventive use of material and form in Untitled (Mylar) from 2007. Continuing her exploration of unexpected materials, Donovan rolls silver Mylar sheets into cones that she then aggregates into molecular structures. She considers the sculpture “site-responsive” as it captures, reflects, and refracts light differently in each exhibition context. In May, Pace presented an exhibition of new and recent work by Donovan in New York concurrent with a survey of the artist’s work from 2000 to the present at its Menlo Park gallery. Tara Donovan will be featured in Cycle, an exhibition that celebrates the centenary of Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades, presented at the Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, São Paulo from August 23 to October 27.

    Pace will also include recent works on paper and bronze sculptures by Yoshimoto Nara that exemplify his singular engagement with international popular culture. Selections from Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Seascape and Lightning Fields series will also be on view at ArtRio, along with other examples of his photography from the past two decades. Pace’s presentation will also include a unique cadmium red wood-block sculpture by Donald Judd, produced in 1968.

View More

News

Pace is delighted to return to ArtRio, at the Pier Mauá, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 10 – 14 September 2014 (Booth 16, Pavilion 3).